(via word-stuck)




Fangirl Challenge 1/10 TV Shows
Doctor Who

Fangirl Challenge 1/10 TV Shows

Doctor Who

(via doctorwho)


breathtakingdestinations:

Chrysler Building - New York City - New York - USA (von Ruben Moreno Montoliu)

breathtakingdestinations:

Chrysler Building - New York City - New York - USA (von Ruben Moreno Montoliu)


(via soleste)


portraitsofboston:

     “I’m originally from Panama, and I came here for college.  My grandfather was one of the construction workers on the Panama Canal, which turns 100 years old in August.  It’s one of the wonders of the world, affected migration into Panama, and shaped the country, and my family had something to do with it.     ”So I’m a writer and I write about my experiences growing up and how it grounded me into being proud of who I am: a Black woman, a Latino woman and a Caribbean descendent. Being Black is not easy: You hear such negative things about what it means to be Black. But I had a very strong family upbringing that made me proud of the color of my skin, proud of where I come from, and proud of my ancestors and their story.”     “How did you feel when you came here for college?”     “Oh gosh, it was very different.  I was not black enough to be an African-American, and I was too black to be Latina. That’s what I write about—that I walk both worlds, and both worlds have put me into a position to choose, and both worlds are very much a part of who I am.  I work on helping both sides see each other as brothers and sisters and focus on the commonalities, not the differences. The only difference at times is our language: Here they speak English, and Panama’s first language is Spanish.”

portraitsofboston:

     “I’m originally from Panama, and I came here for college.  My grandfather was one of the construction workers on the Panama Canal, which turns 100 years old in August.  It’s one of the wonders of the world, affected migration into Panama, and shaped the country, and my family had something to do with it.
     ”So I’m a writer and I write about my experiences growing up and how it grounded me into being proud of who I am: a Black woman, a Latino woman and a Caribbean descendent. Being Black is not easy: You hear such negative things about what it means to be Black. But I had a very strong family upbringing that made me proud of the color of my skin, proud of where I come from, and proud of my ancestors and their story.”
     “How did you feel when you came here for college?”
     “Oh gosh, it was very different.  I was not black enough to be an African-American, and I was too black to be Latina. That’s what I write about—that I walk both worlds, and both worlds have put me into a position to choose, and both worlds are very much a part of who I am.  I work on helping both sides see each other as brothers and sisters and focus on the commonalities, not the differences. The only difference at times is our language: Here they speak English, and Panama’s first language is Spanish.”


portraitsofboston:

     “I’m the postman. I’m also a photographer. I’d rather be a painter, but since I don’t have the time, I take pictures instead. I can’t think of anything else to tell you.”     “What about something you’ve done in the past?”     “I taught English in Japan for four years, and that was my favorite job. Being a foreigner is a lot of fun. I traveled a lot when I was younger. I’ve been to 40 countries. I went all the way across Eurasia without taking an airplane. I would hitchhike, walk, take a boat, or ride a train.     “I found that, the more I traveled, the world was both expanding and getting smaller at the same time. That’s the paradox, the contradiction. The more different the people you meet are—and they can be very, very different—the more similar they look after you talk to them.”     “How did you get into delivering mail after being a teacher and traveling so much?”     “Well, here’s something else about me: I’ve had so many jobs in my life that if you ask me to recite all of them, I would never be able to. There are too many for me to remember, and not a single one of my jobs has been related in any way to the previous one or to any other job I’ve had. All my life, I have changed jobs every few years—different countries, different cities, different professions. It keeps me young. Everything is new. I don’t choose my jobs because of money. I choose them because they are interesting to me at the moment.”     “Still, could you try to recall some of your jobs?”     “OK. I was a whale-watching videographer. I picked oranges in Greece. I did construction in West Berlin. I was a heroin counselor in New York City. Oh, I was also a diplomat: I worked at the United States Embassy in Madrid. I’ve been a postman for one year. I’ll do it maybe another two or three years, and then I’ll change to something completely different. I don’t know, maybe I’ll be a doctor. I’m not done living yet.”

portraitsofboston:

     “I’m the postman. I’m also a photographer. I’d rather be a painter, but since I don’t have the time, I take pictures instead. I can’t think of anything else to tell you.”
     “What about something you’ve done in the past?”
     “I taught English in Japan for four years, and that was my favorite job. Being a foreigner is a lot of fun. I traveled a lot when I was younger. I’ve been to 40 countries. I went all the way across Eurasia without taking an airplane. I would hitchhike, walk, take a boat, or ride a train.
     “I found that, the more I traveled, the world was both expanding and getting smaller at the same time. That’s the paradox, the contradiction. The more different the people you meet are—and they can be very, very different—the more similar they look after you talk to them.”
     “How did you get into delivering mail after being a teacher and traveling so much?”
     “Well, here’s something else about me: I’ve had so many jobs in my life that if you ask me to recite all of them, I would never be able to. There are too many for me to remember, and not a single one of my jobs has been related in any way to the previous one or to any other job I’ve had. All my life, I have changed jobs every few years—different countries, different cities, different professions. It keeps me young. Everything is new. I don’t choose my jobs because of money. I choose them because they are interesting to me at the moment.”
     “Still, could you try to recall some of your jobs?”
     “OK. I was a whale-watching videographer. I picked oranges in Greece. I did construction in West Berlin. I was a heroin counselor in New York City. Oh, I was also a diplomat: I worked at the United States Embassy in Madrid. I’ve been a postman for one year. I’ll do it maybe another two or three years, and then I’ll change to something completely different. I don’t know, maybe I’ll be a doctor. I’m not done living yet.”


breathtakingdestinations:

Old Town - Edinburgh - Scotland (von Peter Nijenhuis)

breathtakingdestinations:

Old Town - Edinburgh - Scotland (von Peter Nijenhuis)


mbphotograph:

Missing the London Underground.

Follow me for more travel photography- mbphotograph